Catering 2.0 meets underground, pop-up dining in 'Kitchensurfing'

Catering 2.0 meets underground, pop-up dining in 'Kitchensurfing'

Based out of New York, Kitchensurfing launched this spring as a way to connect chefs without kitchens with gourmands looking to host an intimate, authentic, restaurant-grade meal.

Less than a year after its launch, the concept has been exported to Berlin where it launched this fall, in a city filled with adventurous expats and a young, dynamic food scene, said company co-founder Chris Muscarella in an interview with food blog Fine Dining Lovers.

It’s a win-win situation: chefs who may spend their working days preparing the same repetitive recipes get to exercise their culinary creativity while prospective hosts can choose from a roster of chefs with different specialties and different price points ranging from $45 to $100 an hour.

Hosts can look for chefs who specialize in everything from breakfast and brunch menus, vegetarian fare, Spanish to Senegalese menus.

In addition to providing a more intimate and quieter venue for larger dinner groups, the concept also works well for diners with specific food intolerances, allergies or for those looking for specific, customizable menu requests, says Kitchensurfing.

Once the event is over, hosts then leave a public review for other users to see.

Another interesting digital dining experience is to pair menus with musical soundtracks. From celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, to wineries and websites, playlists inspired by menus or vice versa are being created to help set the dining mood.

For example, both Oliver and California winery Concannon Vineyard used free digital music service Spotify, while  husband and wife music writer and chef team at Turntable Kitchen pair use their respective expertise to come up with food and music pairing suggestions, not unlike matches made for food and wine.